Left-Handed Drumming

There are two dominant types of drummers’ hands in the world – right and left. Throughout history, the left-handed minority has often been misunderstood and even persecuted. But what about left-handed drumming? Is it really that different from playing right-handed? In this article, we’ll take a look at the pros and cons of playing drums left-handed, and we’ll also explore the option of playing open-handed.

Right-handed vs Left-handed Drumming

The most obvious difference between playing drums right-handed and left-handed is the hand you use to hold the sticks. When you play right-handed, your left hand is free to control the hi-hat or ride cymbal, while your right-hand plays the snare and bass drums. When you play left-handed, your right hand is free to control the hi-hat or ride cymbal, while your left-hand plays the snare and bass drums.

This difference can be a bit of a challenge for beginners, who may find it difficult to get used to using their non-dominant hand for such a complex task. But with a little practice, most people can adapt quite easily.

Should You Learn to Play Left-Handed?

There is no right or wrong answer to this question – it depends on your own personal preference and playing style. Some drummers find it easier to play left-handed, while others prefer to stick with the traditional right-handed approach.

If you’re just starting out, it might be a good idea to try both methods and see which one feels more comfortable. With a little practice, you’ll eventually develop your own personal style.

Benefits of Left-Handed Drum Setups

There are actually a few benefits to using a left-handed drum setup, even if you are not left-handed yourself.

If you are right-handed, using a left-handed drum set can help to improve your coordination and dexterity. It can also help to improve your understanding of rhythm, as you will be playing the opposite hand to what you are used to.

For a lefty drummer, using a right-handed drum set can help to improve your coordination and dexterity. It can also help to improve your understanding of rhythm, as you will be playing the same hand as you are used to.

In addition to these benefits, using a left-handed drum set can also help to make you a more versatile drummer. If you are ever asked to play a song or a part that is not written for a left-handed drummer, you will be able to do so without any trouble.

Downsides of Left-Handed Drum Setups

There are a few potential downsides to using a left-handed drum setup.

The first is that it can be more difficult to find left-handed drum gear. This is especially true for larger items like drums and cymbals.

Another potential downside is that it can be more difficult to find left-handed drummers. If you’re looking to form a band or join an existing one, it’s worth checking to see if there are any left-handed drummers in your area.

Finally, left-handed drum setups can be a bit more challenging to master. This is especially true if you’re used to playing right-handed. It may take some time to get used to the new layout and feel comfortable playing in this position.

person is playing on drums

The Third Option: Open-Handed Drumming

If you’re not sure whether you want to learn to play left-handed or right-handed, there is another option to consider – open-handed drumming. “Left-hand open” allows you to use either hand to play the snare and bass drums, while your left-hand controls the hi-hat and ride cymbal.

This approach can be a good option for beginners, as it allows you to experiment with both hands and find the method that works best for you. It can also be helpful for drummers who want to play with both hands equally, as it can be difficult to do this with traditional right-handed drumming.

Percussionist Setup for a Left-Handed Drum Setup

  1. Place a crash cymbal on your left side, towards the front of your drum kit. This will be your main crash cymbal.
  2. Place a ride cymbal on your left side, towards the back of your left-handed drum kit.
  3. Place a hi-hat cymbal on your left side, towards the front of your drum kit.
  4. Place a floor tom on your left side, towards the back of your drum kit.
  5. Place a rack tom on your left side, towards the front of your drum kit.
  6. Place a snare drum on your left side, towards the middle of your drum kit.

Tips for Teaching Left-Handed Players

If you’re a drummer who is teaching left-handed students, here are a few tips to help you get started:

  • Start by teaching the basic rudiments of drumming. This will give your students a strong foundation on which to build their skills.
  • Encourage your students to experiment and find what works best for them. Every drummer is different, and each one has their own unique playing style.
  • Be patient and give your students plenty of practice time. It takes time and practice to develop strong skills on the drums.

person learns to play drums

Famous Left-Handed Drummers

There are many famous left-handed drummers out there, and here are just a few of them:

  • Ringo Starr
  • Dave Grohl
  • Phil Collins
  • Stewart Copeland
  • Brian Blade

Conclusion

So, should you learn to play drums left-handed? It’s up to you – there is no right or wrong answer. If you’re not sure which method is right for you, why not try both? With a little practice, you’ll eventually find the playing style that works best for you.

There is no definitive answer to this question as it depends on personal preference. Some left-handed people prefer to use materials designed for right-handed people, while others prefer to use items specifically designed for left-handed people. The same goes for drum setups – some left-handed drummers prefer to use a right-handed drum kit, while others prefer a left-handed kit. Ultimately, it comes down to what feels most comfortable and natural to the individual.

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