User Posts: editor
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Master Dubstep Music with Dubstep Drum Pads 24
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Dubstep Drum Pads 24 is a relatively small, but a rather functional application for creating musical rhythms and exclusive tracks in the dubstep genre. Those ...

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ORG 2020: The Most Advanced Mobile Keyboard
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When you see the name ORG and a virtual MIDI keyboard, you may think a letter is missing. In fact, this emulator is based on KORG and YAMAHA instruments and as ...

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SUPER PADS: Play and Remix Your Favorite Songs
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When the app’s name starts with “SUPER” (plus CAPS LOCK!), it’s always suspicious. While installing this app on my tablet, I expected it to be just a big-name ...

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Make Electronic Music on the Go with Electro Drum Pads 24
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Well, here comes another app by Paul Lipnyagov, the author of the great Drum Pads 24. It seems a no-brainer that this one is a special version of the core app, ...

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Have Fun and Improve Your Skills with Groovepad
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Like other apps by Easybrain, it’s rather a simulator of a sampler than a serious thing. Not being a professional musical tool, it’s meant for education or ...

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Hip Hop Pads for Hip Hop Admirers
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As a professional drummer, I never had to play or compose hip hop music, but it doesn’t mean I wasn’t interested in it. When I found this app on the list, I ...

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Drum Kit (Drums) free: Slappy Snares & Tight Hats
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Drum Kit (Drums) free offers us a free collection of drum kits. This time I will be reviewing only Hip-Hop and Classic since Metal and Electro are available in ...

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Drum Studio: Drum Roll With Cheese
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Drum Studio is another free drum simulator in our series. I have to admit it’s a peculiar dish that leaves a bittersweet aftertaste. On the one hand, I like ...

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Make Beats with Drum Pads – Beat Maker Go!
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Making beats on a mobile device is quite different from that on PC (and nothing in common with live drums), but now it’s a genre in its own right. Beat Maker ...

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Drum Pads 24: A Pro App for Making Music
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Drum Pads 24 by Paul Lipnyagov seems just another drum toy, a real drum machine simulator. These apps are usually meant to show the beginners how it feels to ...

Browsing All Comments By: editor
  1. Hey there. If your carpet doesn’t have a rubber bottom then you should definitely consider placing a mat under it. Some people might say that sliding also depends on how fast you play but from my experience, it’s just better to have a decent drum rug without overthinking it.

  2. That depends on the floor surface you want to play. A thin rubber pad might help you If you have hardwood, laminate flooring or even glossy tiles. Also, I saw some people use rubber coated shelf liner, but I haven’t tested anything like that yet and thus can’t recommend it.

  3. Hello. There are two factors which you should consider choosing size of a drum rug. First of all, it’s size is supposed to be bigger than your drum kit. Though some drummers use separate rugs to stabilize a bass drum or cymbals only, consider this as an option too. The second factor is the surface you will be playing on. But nowadays most drum rugs have non slip bottoms that allow playing even on smooth and sliding surfaces.

  4. Hi there. As far as I know, Meinl is already a decent rug and doesn’t require any pads underneath. Due to its thickness and rubbered bottom, I doubt you’ll ever need any extra layer under such carpet. Moreover, sometimes an additional mat can even cause slipping and that’s definitely not what you’d want during the gig.

  5. Hey there, Zach. A rug pad should be smaller than the size of a rug. Though some drum rugs are already padded with rubber and that means you don’t need any additional pad underneath. For example, the Meinl percussion drum rug is like this. But if you don’t like the look of classic carpet under your drum kit then I would suggest Roland TDM25, which I already mentioned above.

  6. Hello! There are no secret techniques for recording metal drums. First of all, keeping the mic far from your drums gives you wider stereo, but if you’re looking for the opposite effect then try keeping the mic near the cymbals. Some early metal bands were using additional cymbal mics, but you can experiment and use it as you want. But I would recommend also trying a good old XY method where you place two microphones near each other so they would resonate and with each other, which should give even more to your stereo image.

  7. That’s a very good question I keep hearing from musicians from all over the world. I guess I should write another article about that someday 🙂 Ok, there are many reasons to use a drum rug, but the main ones are thickness, tight backing, weighted corners and finished edges. Don’t forget that you will be also using velcro straps to hold bass pedals and cymbal stands.

  8. Hey, Jarred. It’s always good to see a fellow drummer here. I have a piece of advice for you but first of all, I need to know what rug are you using. Some people just use ones from the carpet store, but I wouldn’t recommend that due to the quality and sizes. Those carpets just aren’t designed for musicians, you need to get another one for sure. To stop your bass drum from sliding you should consider checking its feet, if the rubber on it is worn out this might be the issue, try installing new ones.