Classic Drum: Android Drum Kit with Punching Sounds

[top_baner_square]

Classic Drum: Bonham, Moon or Ringo?

Classic Drum is a decent drum-sim by Kolb Apps. The developing studio did a good job again. So we have an eye-pleasing interface, a worthy drum station, and a bunch of some extra goodies that a newcomer can benefit from. But again: no metronome, folks.

[top_baner_horizontal]

Nothing Beats the Classic

Your weapon of noise-making is an acoustic drum kit. The station is quite basic:

  • One bass drum;
  • Snare;
  • Closed/open hi-hat;
  • Three crashes;
  • Ride;
  • High, mid and floor tom;
  • Tambo and cowbell.

It’s rather an austere arsenal. But as they say, sometimes less is more. So that’s all you get. No electronic, experimental or hip-hop kits are included. The Classic Drum is pretty quick to respond to your touch. Although I’ve noticed that when you put three fingers on your screen at once, certain lagging kicks in and disrupts the rhythm.

What I enjoy about the application is that you can tweak each part of the set individually. Tap a cymbal icon at the top of the screen and then select an element: ride, cowbell, kick, etc. Then you’ll be prompted to adjust volume, pitch and even panorama.

Left-handed Android drummers will enjoy the swap feature. If you tap two orange ‘recycling’ arrows at the top, they’ll swap hi-hats with floor tom and cowbell. So, now you can use your leading hand to play the main rhythm and maintain pace with the right hand.

Repeat After Me!

But the most enjoyable aspect of Classic Drum is its tutorial catalog. Tap the blue play button, and you will find 70 lessons that break down, step by step, how to play blues, heavy metal, funk, hip-hop, pop, and sertanejo patterns. First, you’ll listen to the original loop. Then the lesson mode will highlight which parts (and when) you must hit.

Apart from lessons, there’s a catalog of loops to play along with. You’ll get to boost your improvisation skills with dubstep, funk, gospel, heavy metal, house, Latin and others catchy riffs. Although, they give you a strong plastic aftertaste of midi.

As usual, you can record your drumming to document the progress and maturity of your style. But there’s no metronome to support you. So you either have to be a confident pacemaker or get metronome loops rendered in MP3. Hint: such a loop can be played right in the app through the Songs option.

Pros and Cons

[bottom_baner_square]

It’s Drummer Time

I’m pretty much satisfied with Classic Drum. I like its Lessons, which show the fundamental drum patterns for various genres. It’s an awesome way to learn the basics of our noisy art, without hurting anybody’s ears. You will also get an idea of what a typical drum practice is like. (Hours of rehearsing the same schemes over and over).

We will be happy to hear your thoughts

      Leave a reply

      Solve : *
      15 − 11 =


      SimplyDrum
      Logo